The 13th International Conference on Grammatical Inference

is to be held in Delft, The Netherlands, from October 5 through October 7, 2016.

ICGI is a biannual conference on all aspects of grammatical inference, including (but not limited to) theoretical and experimental analysis of different models of grammar induction, and algorithms for induction of different classes of languages and automata.

Colocated with ICGI 2016 is SPiCe, a competition about guessing the next element in a sequence.

Visit the website »

A late-breaking call for work in progress and ideas is now open until July 24, 2016!

Late-breaking call »

ICGI 2016 seeks to provide a forum for presentation and discussion of original research papers on all aspects of grammatical inference.

Key interests are machine-learning methods applied to discrete combinatorial structures such as strings, trees, or graphs, and algorithms for learning symbolic models such as grammars, automata, Markov models, or pattern languages.

The conference seeks to provide a forum for presentation and discussion of original research papers on all aspects of grammatical inference including, but not limited to:

We invite researchers to submit original, unpublished research that fits the scope of ICGI 2016 by June 12, 2016 AOE through EasyChair. The conference proceedings will be published in JMLR: Workshop and Conference Proceedings.

Important Dates

We invite three types of papers:

There are no restrictions on the domain of application as long as the paper provides sufficient background information.

Each paper should contain title, authors and affiliation, mailing address, a brief abstract describing the work and at least three keywords which can describe the contents of the work.

Papers must be submitted in pdf format. The total length of the paper should not exceed 12 pages on A4-size paper. The use of LaTeX is strongly encouraged. Prospective authors are strongly recommended to use the JMLR style file for LaTeX.

We are looking forward to your submissions. For questions about your submission or the conference in general, you can contact Rick Smetsers.

Submission for regular papers is now closed.

We are now calling for work in progress and ideas that may be of interest to the grammatical inference community.

You will get the opportunity to present and discuss your work in progress or ideas in a designated session of ICGI. Abstracts of work in progress will not appear in the proceedings (as they will not be peer reviewed), but will appear in a conference booklet and on the website.

All abstracts should be submitted by email to rick (AT) cs (DOT) ru (DOT) nl by July 24, 2016.

Important Dates

We invite abstracts on work in progress, which can be either theoretical or experimental, fundamental or application-oriented, solving or proposing important problems.

Prospective authors are invited to submit an abstract which represents original and previously unpublished work. Simultaneous submission to other conferences with published proceedings is not allowed.

Each abstract should contain title, authors and affiliation, mailing address, and at least three keywords which can describe the contents of the work.

Abstracts must be submitted in pdf format. The total length of the paper should not exceed 2 pages on A4-size paper. The use of LaTeX is strongly encouraged. Prospective authors are strongly recommended to use the JMLR style file for LaTeX.

Abstracts will appear in a conference booklet and on the website, and a presentation should be given in the special session.

All abstracts should be submitted by email to rick (AT) cs (DOT) ru (DOT) nl by July 24, 2016.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

The following top researchers will be keynote speakers at ICGI 2016:

Mehryar Mohri

Mehryar Mohri

Mehryar Mohri is a Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in New York and a Research Consultant at Google. His principal area of research is machine learning but his research covers many other areas, including algorithms and theory, automata theory, speech processing, natural language processing, and the design of general-purpose software libraries.

Prof. Mohri is the author of the book Foundations of Machine Learning used in graduate courses in several universities and corporate research laboratories. His research in learning theory and algorithms has been used in a variety of applications. His work on automata theory and algorithms has served as the foundation for several applications in language processing, with several of his algorithms used in virtually all spoken-dialog and speech recognitions systems used in the United States.

Besides, Prof. Mohri has also co-authored several software libraries widely used in research and academic labs.

An abstract of Prof. Mohri's talk is TBA.

Hendrik Blockeel

Hendrik Blockeel

Hendrik Blockeel is a professor at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium), and part-time associate professor at the University of Leiden (The Netherlands). His research interests include theory and algorithms for machine learning and data mining in general, with a particular focus on relational learning, graph mining, probabilistic logics, inductive knowledge bases, and applications of these techniques in the broader field of computer science, bio-informatics, and medical informatics.

Prof. Blockeel's main research results include an efficient and versatile relational decision tree learning tool, that has been used in many relational learning applications, a framework for symbolic machine learning that generalized decision tree and rule learning, and experiment databases for machine learning.

An abstract of Prof. Blockeel's talk is TBA.

Valerin Spitkovsky

Valentin Spitkovsky

Valentin Spitkovsky completed a doctoral dissertation in Computational Linguistics at Stanford's Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in 2014. His focus has been on unsupervised parsing and grammar induction.

Since then, he has been doing research at Google on Natural Language Processing, Data Mining and Modeling, Machine Intelligence, and Information Retrieval.

An abstract of Dr. Spitkovsky's talk is TBA.

ICGI 2016 will be held in Delft, The Netherlands.

Delft is a historic town, known for its canals, iconic pottery, painter Johannes Vermeer, microbiologist Antony van Leeuwenhoek, and its association with the Dutch Royal House. This image shows an aerial view of Delft with from left to right three churches, a university tower building and an iconic windmill.

Delft is situated in the provence of South Holland between the cities of Rotterdam and The Hague, in the central (western) part of the Netherlands.

The nearest international airport (Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, AMS) is approximately 40 minutes away by public transport.

Trains from Schiphol to Delft are serviced by NS and typically run throughout the entire day and night. We suggest you use NS Journeyplanner for planning your trip.

NS Journeyplanner »

Conference Venue

The conference will be held in "De Mekelzaal", which is part of Science Centre Delft.

The address of the venue is:

Science Centre Delft
Mijnbouwstraat 120
2628 RX Delft

Registration will start in summer. There will be a special rate for SIKS PhD students.

TBA